12 Things to Know About Crazy Horse

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Crazy Horse or Ta-Sunko-Witko, were the legendary warrior and Lakota leader Oglala, who defended the land of Oglala and helped defeat General George Armstrong Custer at the Battle of Little Bighorn. “We chose our own way of living,” Crazy Horse reportedly reported. “We were no expense to the government. All we wanted was peace and be left alone. ” Learn more about the military leader of Lakota.

1. “CRAZY HORSE” WAS NOT THE FIRST NAME.

Born approximately in 1840 to Lakota parents, Crazy Horse was originally named Cha-O-Khoi, or Among the Trees. (His mother, however, insisted on calling him “Curly.”) When Cha-O-Ha reached maturity, he was given the name spent by his father and grandfather – Ta-Sunko-Witko, or Crazy Horse.

2. He escaped with the man’s wife and was shot in the face …

In the 1860s, Crazy Horse fell in love with a married woman named the Black Buffalo Woman and persuaded her to flee with him. When her husband found out, he persistently sought amateurs and tried to shoot at Crazy Horse. Fortunately, just before the man pulled the trigger, a close friend of the Crazy Horse, Touch of the Cloud, punched the weapon up. Instead of hitting the Crazy Horse on the chest, an unholy bullet hit him on the jaw.

3 … AND THIS FAST FASHION LOVED IN ANOTHER WOMAN.

After the Crazy Horse was shot, a woman named Black Shawl was sent to help him heal. Once again Crazy Horse fell in love. They married and had a daughter who died when she was a baby.

4. HE RECEIVED ITS FIRST BREAK TASTE THANKS TO THE WISDING COW.

In 1854 a free cow wandered to the Lakota camp in modern Wyoming. The cow did not last long there: Someone killed him, scored it and shared the meat among the community. Soon after, Lieutenant John Lawrence Gratten and 29 US troops arrived in the camp with the intention of arresting whoever “stole” the cow. Eventually they shot and killed the Lakota leader, Conquering the Bear. In response, Lakota killed all 30 soldiers. The young Crazy Horse saw it all, and the event drowned his mistrust of the white people.

5. AFTER THE CRAZY HORSE CASES, WENT TO SEARCH FOR VISION.

Young people of the tribes of the plains were prone to seek visions, which were something like instructions for the fulfillment of fate. After refusing to eat or drink for four days, Crazy Horse began to see visions from another world: He learned that if he lived simply and gave up military trophies, and accepted the ideal of simplicity, he would never suffer in battle. Only with one exception it is said that the Crazy Horse has never been wounded in the next wars.

6. THE BIGGEST BATTLES OF CRAZY HORSE HAVE BEEN ASKED TO LIKE AMERICA TO GOLD.

The US government has damaged many of the agreements it signed with the Native Americans, because it craved gold. In 1863 the conductor John Bozeman paved the way to the gold mines of Montana through Sioux, Cheyenne and the territory of Arapaho that agreement of 1851, made by the banned white. The forces rose. In 1864 the Colorado militiamen killed more than 200 peaceful Cheyenne, the majority of which were women and children. In the years following, the Indian tribes began to seek revenge against white soldiers who could not respect the agreements.

On December 21, 1866, Captain William Fetterman brought about 80 men from Fort Wyoming Phil Kearny, a large garrison created to protect white immigrants and gold seekers. Crazy Horse planted traps along their route. The Fetterman men followed – and rushed into the hands of 1000 hiding warriors. All American soldiers were destroyed. (The Americans called his Massacre Fetterman, but Lakota called his Battle of Hundreds in his hands.)

7. DAMAGED AGREEMENT INVOLVED INTO CONFLICT CRAZY HORSE AND CUSTER.

The 1868 agreement on Fort Laramie announced that the Black Hills of South Dakota belonged to Sioux, but the agreement was terminated just six years after it was signed – all because the scouts discovered gold in the area. In 1874 the government sent General George Armstrong Custer to lead the review party there. When Sioux did not sell these lands, the government ordered them for a smaller reservation, which the Native Americans refused. These events would lead to the biggest battles of Crazy Horse.

8. HIS LEADERSHIP IN THE BOTTON OF ROSE BOTTON RECORDED DOOM CUSTER.

In 1876, the US War Department ordered the entire Lakota to reserve. Crazy Horse refused. Instead, he led Lakota 1500 and Cheyenne warriors in a battle against brigadier-general George Crook, whose men were trying to approach the head of the Lakota Hunkpapa campsite of the Located Bull in the Little Bighorn. The battle was a strategic victory for Crazy Horse: It sent Crook’s army packing and stripped George Custer’s Seventh Caval of much-needed reinforcements. Crazy Horse stopped working, the Battle of Little Bighorn, which followed shortly after, may have developed differently.

9. His speech at the Battle of the Small Thistoga was Legally.

And we mean the legendary – no one is sure that, for sure, did the Crazy Horse. But there are rumors. Arapaho warrior named Water Man said that Crazy Horse “was the bravest man I’ve ever seen. He rode closest to the soldiers, screaming at his soldiers. All the soldiers shot at him, but he was never amazed. ” Another Indian soldier said, “The greatest fighter in the whole battle was Crazy Horse.”

10. HE COULD INTO CAPITULATION.

After the Battle of Little Bighorn, two of the main battle leaders – Sitting Bull and Malice – left for Canada. Crazy Horse remained in America. It was a fateful decision. At that time, Colonel Nelson A. Miles was hellbent when forcing all Native Americans to make reservations, and during the winter of 1876 and 1877, Miles struck Lakota where it hurt: the buffalo herds were wrecked and the winter became especially difficult for people of Crazy Horse . After a long period of cold and hunger, the Crazy Horse surrendered. He was sent to a reservation at Fort Robinson, Nebraska.

11. HE WAS HOSPITAL.

In September 1877 Crazy Horse left the reservation without permission. (His wife fell ill and he tried to take her to her parents.) Afraid that the warrior might return to the battle, General Hook ordered him arrested. During his arrest, the Crazy Horse fought, and the soldier stabbed his bayonet into the body. It was a fatal blow. Since Crazy Horse was bleeding, he was offered a cot, but he turned them off. He died on the floor.

12. IF FINISHED, THE CRAZY HORSE MEMORIAL MAY BE THE BIGGEST SCULPTURE IN THE WORLD.

In the process of construction since 1948, the Crazy Horse Memorial was commissioned by Henry Standing Bir, the head of Lakota Oglala in the late 1930s, as a response to Mount Rushmore. Today, the memorial – built by a non-profit organization that refuses budget funding – is still incomplete. When it’s finished, the monument carved into the side of the South Dakota Mountain Thunderhead will be standing 563 feet high.